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  • GIVING PATIENTS THE GIFT OF COMPASSION AT HACKENSACK UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

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  • Connexient Joins the Epic App Orchard to Drive Innovation and Transformation in Patient Experience

    Today, Connexient marked a major milestone in our evolution by joining the Epic App Orchard to drive innovation and transformation in Patient Experience together with our forward leaning clients. Connexient

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TAG Cloud

I recently came across this position paper called:

published by the outstanding Center for Health Design.

While it was published in 1992 - and thus predates virtually all Digital Wayfinding - it is strking how the issues and principles it articulates continue to resonate.  To excerpts stand-out.

The Benefits of Good Wayfinding

In sum, good wayfinding promotes

  • Reduction of stress and frustration for the visitor
  • Functional efficiency
  • Visitor accessibility
  • Safety
  • Patient empowerment, improving cognitive skills in spatial understanding
  • Improved bottom line

All of those benefits apply to Digital Wayfinding, of course, but even more powerfully. We start with addressing patient and visitor stress, and all the impacts that has, but that is just the starting point. Some of the most compelling use cases we are now discussing and addressing with our clients in our roadmap revolve around staff efficiency and safety and security. This is all part of our vision of Navigation Enabling the Enterprise.

The Dynamic Nature of Wayfinding

The White Paper presents a very clear understanding of the "dynamic" nature of Wayfinding.

Unlike spatial orientation with its static relationship to space, wayfinding is a dynamic relationship to the space. It is dynamic in that people’s movement with their direct sense of orientation to place must be accommodated

It then lays out the rinciples of good wayfinding system design.

Unlike spatial orientation with its static relationship to space, wayfinding is a dynamic relationship to the space. It is dynamic in that people’s movement with their direct sense of orientation to place must be accommodated

1. Knowing where he or she is (i.e., “I have just arrived at the front door of the surgery center”).

2. Knowing his or her destination (i.e., “My instructions from the physician’s office indicate that I need to check in and register with the information desk”).

3. Knowing which route gets him or her to the destination (i.e., “The information receptionist told me to follow the signs to the elevator and take the elevator to the third-floor surgery waiting room and check-in desk”).

4. The ability to follow that route (i.e., “I need to locate and interpret appropriate signs that lead me to the elevators, exit the elevator on the third floor, and locate the surgery waiting room”).

5. Knowing when he or she has reached the destination (i.e., “This appears to be the surgical waiting room, and the desk is most likely for registration”).

All of these are core principles in the design of our Indoor Navigation UX. There is one fundamentally new and different characteristic of ;Indoor Navigation that differs from static wayfinding systems (i.e. signage), however:

1. Knowing where he or she is

In a navigation UX, that sense of "knowing where you are" goes away -and actually becomes a distraction. Referencing visual landmarks is important - but for a different reason. These indicate to the user that he or she is on the right path - i.e. that navigation is on track. Slowing the user down with map reading and map awareness is counterproductive and confusing.

Navigation is about what is next and where you are going, not where you are.

In a typical wayfinding journey, a user might well shift between navigation to map reading - in which case that location and map awareness come to the forefront again. That is why Connexient puts so much emphasis on all modalities and all screens, not just navigation. But they key to navigation is understanding the difference!

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